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Nigerian Executives to Examine Midwest HRW Crop
June 19, 2014
ARLINGTON, Virginia — Eight senior managers from Nigeria’s milling and noodle/pasta manufacturing industries will visit Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas June 22 to 28, 2014, to examine the current hard red winter (HRW) crop as part of a U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) trade team.

Nigeria was the fifth largest buyer of U.S. wheat for the 2013/14 marketing year (June to May), importing 98.8 million bushels (2.69 million metric tons) and purchasing five of the six classes of U.S. wheat. In comparison, Nigerian millers purchased 12.9 million bushels (350,000 metric tons) 12 years ago, after their government ended a six-year ban on wheat imports in 1992.

“The growth of U.S. wheat exports to Nigeria has been exceptional,” said USW Regional Assistant Director Gerald Theus, based in Cape Town, South Africa, who will accompany the team. “Thanks to the relationships built in Nigeria and between the farmers, USW and Nigerian millers on teams like these, U.S. wheat has found a home in Nigeria. And it is there to stay.”

These millers will meet with wheat breeders, tour grain cooperatives and shuttle loading facilities as well as visit several wheat farms. That includes the farm near Elsie, NE, of Brent Robertson, who visited Nigeria in January as part of a USW Board Team. Trade teams help reassure world wheat customers of a steady and uninterrupted supply of high quality wheat as well as provide a better understanding of the entire U.S. wheat supply chain.

USW collaborated with the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee, Nebraska Wheat Board and Kansas Wheat Commission to organize this trade team.

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat producers and their customers.” USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by FAS.

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2014 Nigerian Trade Team - Team Members

Imran Ur-Rashid
Plant Manager, BUA Pasta Plant

Madhukar Khetan
General Manager of Finance, Dufil Prima Foods Plc

Abu Abari
Chief Engineer, Honeywell Flour Mills Plc

Olubunmi Felicia Ashefor
Import Documentation Manager, Dangote Flour Mills Plc

Olanrewaju Sofoluwe
Head of Division, Flour Mills of Nigeria Plc

Srinivasa Rao Gangavelli
General Manager of Operations, First Blends

Lalit Ganwani
Sales Manager, First Blends

Adesh Jain
Finance Controller, Dufil Prima Foods Plc

Olumuyiwa Talabi
Marketing Consultant, Lagos, U.S. Wheat Associates

Gerald Theus
Regional Assistant Director, Cape Town, U.S. Wheat Associates

USW-Nigeria Partnership on Wheat

Nigeria is the ultimate success story for the U.S. wheat industry. After a six-year wheat ban ended in 1992, Nigeria imported nearly 12.9 million bushels (350,000 MT) of U.S. wheat. That market has now grown to more than 116.8 million bushels (3.18 MMT) the last five years, including purchases of five of the six classes of U.S. wheat.

Nigerian wheat consumption continues to rise rapidly. More and more Nigerians are looking for a nutritious, convenient food and they are finding it in the fastest growing product segment — instant noodles made primarily from HRW. Today, Nigeria is behind only countries in Southeast Asia in per capita consumption and nearly every milling company is manufacturing instant noodles, even though they first appeared on the market less than a decade ago.

The United States dominates Nigeria’s wheat import market, despite increased price competition from other suppliers, including Canada, Australia and the Black Sea region. USW's in-country service office in Lagos and a commitment to technical training and exchanges have combined to build strong Nigerian loyalty to U.S.-origin wheat. Yet, Nigeria continues to have tremendous untapped potential for increased milling capacity, including for Nigerian exports to other West African markets like Ghana.

That commitment to building lasting trade partnerships — coupled with USW’s long-standing presence throughout the African continent — has earned U.S. wheat a reputation for high quality and reliability.


U.S. Wheat Sales to Nigeria
1,000 Metric Tons
Crop Year
(June - May)
HRW
HRS
SRW
SW
Durum
HW
Total
2014
33
0
9
0
0
0
41
2013
2,034
119
490
0
41
12
2,696
2012
2,339
11
380
0
69
98
2,898
2011
2,615
86
437
0
52
125
3,315
2010
2,871
134
444
0
98
115
3,661
2009
2,588
162
366
9
102
120
3,348
2008
2,095
55
382
0
81
50
2,664
2007
2,102
113
313
0
93
0
2,620
2006
1,884
104
392
0
78
0
2,458
2005
2,625
33
338
0
52
0
3,047
Data current through June 16, 2014
NOTE: The Imports from U.S. by Class table is a summary of all wheat inspected for export by the Federal Grain Inspection Service.
One metric ton = 36.74 bushels

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