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Following is a joint statement from U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) and the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG).

ARLINGTON, Virginia – U. S. Wheat Associates (USW) and the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) are pleased that negotiators have reached an agreement in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

“Asia is a growing regional market and this agreement has the potential to increase economic opportunity and wheat demand even in countries where we already have duty free access,” said USW President Alan Tracy. “That is critically important because our competitors like Australia are moving ahead with bilateral agreements that eliminate tariffs on wheat imports with countries like Vietnam. The high standards in the TPP agreement should help us be more competitive and hopefully lead to even more opportunity for our wheat as new countries join TPP in the future.”

“Trade agreements are essential for U.S. wheat farmers with more than 50 percent of our crop heading overseas. Concluding TPP negotiations is a step in the right direction. My fellow farmer-leaders and I look forward to reviewing the final text and working with Congress to determine how this will impact U.S. wheat farmers,” commented NAWG President, Brett Blankenship, wheat grower from Washtucna, Wash.

USW and NAWG thank Ambassador Froman and the entire U.S. team focused on agricultural issues for their leadership and hard work in concluding these important TPP negotiations.

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat producers and their customers.” USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA/FAS.

NAWG is a federation of 22 state wheat grower associations that works to represent the needs and interests of wheat producers before Congress and federal agencies. Based in Washington, D.C., NAWG is grower-governed and grower-funded, and works in areas as diverse as federal farm policy, trade, environmental regulation, agricultural research and sustainability.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) has hired Jeff Coey as Assistant Regional Vice President to fill the vacant position in its Hong Kong office left by Matt Weimar, who recently relocated to the regional office in Singapore as the new Regional Vice President for South Asia. Coey will manage U.S. wheat market development programs and USW’s business and government relationships in China. This includes two offices and staff located in Hong Kong and Beijing.

Coey joins USW with more than 25 years of marketing and trade facilitation experience in East Asia including industry relations and government affairs consulting, as well as demand-building branded retail campaign management. He worked in cotton merchandising in Hong Kong and China and helped set up office operations in Beijing. Most recently, Coey lectured for the master’s degree program at the Hong Kong Baptist University’s School of Communication covering subjects including consumer behavior, intercultural communication, writing for public relations, issues management and crisis response.

“Jeff’s experience in the private sector, commodity trading, market development and academia throughout the greater China region represent an important new asset for the U.S. wheat industry and our China interests,” said Weimar.

“China is a complex market of immense proportions and possibilities,” said USW Vice President of Overseas Operations Vince Peterson. “Jeff has the background and experience necessary to package USW’s efforts in China in a productive manner that allows us to capitalize on those market opportunities.”

Fluent in Mandarin, Coey studied Chinese language and literature at Middlebury College and National Taiwan University. He holds bachelor’s degrees in East Asian Studies and Chinese from the University of Kansas, as well as a Master of Business Administration from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where his concentration was in international business and marketing.

Jeff Coey

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — In 2016, the U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) will mark 60 years with a marketing office in Japan, so it comes as no surprise that in marketing year 2014/15, Japan was the single largest buyer of wheat from the United States. In the same year, Japan was also the biggest market for U.S. hard red spring (HRS) and soft white (SW) wheat. To learn more about the high quality wheat to which their customers have become accustomed over the past 60 years, a team of mid-level managers from Japanese flour mills will visit Oregon, Idaho and Montana Sept. 20 to 26, 2015.

Millers on this team are executives from milling companies representing Japan’s National Cooperative of Millers. The first trade team from this group of millers visited the United States in 2014. USW collaborated with the Montana Wheat and Barley Committee, Oregon Wheat Commission and Idaho Wheat Commission to organize and host this year’s visit.

“These mid-level managers will eventually ascend to senior management positions and hopefully take with them an understanding that the United States produces the highest quality wheat for Japan,” said Steve Wirsching, USW vice president and director of the West Coast Office in Portland, OR. “This trade team visit creates an opportunity for us to increase their positive view of U.S. wheat and ensure we can continue to compete in Japan in the future.”

This trade team will bring individuals involved in milling, quality control and marketing to the United States to learn more about the effective wheat export supply chain and give them the opportunity to discuss logistical and quality assurance systems with the people who manage the U.S. wheat supply chain.

The milling managers will begin their trip in Portland, hosted by the USW West Coast Office, where they will be briefed by the Federal Grain Inspection Service (FGIS) and Wheat Marketing Center. While in Oregon, the team will also tour the Columbia Grains export terminal and visit OMIC USA. Continuing their trip in Boise, ID, the team will meet with Scoular Grain and the Idaho State Department of Agriculture, and will tour the Swan Falls Dam and lock system on the Snake River. To complete their tour of the Pacific Northwest, the team will travel to Montana to tour shuttle train loading facilities operated by Gavilon Grain in Chester and United Grain in Moccasin. Other stops include the Central Ag Research Center near Moccasin and Myllymaki Farms outside of Livingston . Throughout their trip the team will have the opportunity to hear from each of the sponsoring state wheat commissions.

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat producers and their customers.” The activities of USW are made possible by producer checkoff dollars managed by 18 state wheat commissions and through cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. For more information, visit www.uswheat.org or contact your state wheat commission.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia —  A Taiwanese delegation visited Washington, D.C., this week to meet with officials and U.S. grain industry leaders and take part in a signing ceremony at the U.S. Capitol, held Wednesday.

Signing letters of intent on behalf of the U.S. grain industry were Chip Councell, U.S. Grains Council vice chairman; Alan Tracy, U.S. Wheat Associates president; and Wade Cowan, American Soybean Association president representing the U.S. Soybean Export Council.

The letters committed Taiwanese buyers to purchase approximately $3.03 billion worth of U.S. corn and co-products, wheat and soybeans by 2017.

The delegation will follow their Washington visit with a week of touring the U.S. grain production region, including much of the U.S. Midwest and West.

More about the event is at https://bit.ly/1KiEgmF and https://bit.ly/1WSXmcT.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) and the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) unveiled the results of an econometric study showing that excessive farm support in several advanced developing countries could cost U.S. wheat farmers nearly $1 billion in revenue every year. USW recently showed that the governments of China, India, Turkey and Brazil have dramatically increased subsidies for domestic wheat production over the past ten years to levels that far exceed their World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements. This study confirms that these policies have a detrimental effect on U.S. and world wheat farmers and global wheat trade.

“I believe we have shown through these studies that the old perceptions about farm support and trade are clearly wrong,” said USW President Alan Tracy. “Today, it is the farm subsidies in a few advanced developing countries, not developed country policies, which disrupt normal trade flows and distort world wheat prices. These rapidly growing subsidies cause direct, serious and now measurable impacts on the prices that U.S. farmers receive for their grain.”

Noted agricultural economist Dr. Dermot Hayes and two of his colleagues at Iowa State University conducted the study. The goal was to determine what would happen to U.S. and global wheat production, trade and prices if domestic support in China, India, Turkey and Brazil were removed. To accomplish this, Dr. Hayes and his colleagues applied the price support and input subsidy data identified in a November 2014 study by DTB Associates to the respected CARD-FAPRI econometric model. Results showed that if all support were removed from all four countries, annual U.S. wheat production would increase by more than 53 million bushels, farm gate prices would increase by nearly $0.30 per bushel and U.S. wheat farmers would receive $947 million more in annual revenue (See Chart 1).

“The results confirm that if domestic support were removed wheat prices in the countries modeled would go down and farmers would plant less wheat, but domestic consumption would go up,” Hayes said. “The lower supply would lead to higher global wheat prices, which tend to benefit wheat exporting countries including the United States.”

The study also indicated that with such changes, wheat trade flows would shift and the four countries would increase net imports by nearly 10 million metric tons (MMT). Hayes said the model estimated the United States would capture more than 20 percent of such an increase to export an additional 2.2 MMT compared to the model’s baseline if there were no changes in domestic support in those countries.

Hayes’ team also used the model to predict the net effect that eliminating support in individual countries would have (See Table 1). Those results indicated that domestic support for Chinese wheat production alone has the largest individual effect. If support there ended, Chinese imports would grow from nearly 2 MMT per year to more than 7.5 MMT per year. This would still be less than the 9 MMT annual tariff rate quota that China agreed to in its WTO accession commitments. Hayes said the model showed that even with the predicted changes, China, India, and Turkey would continue to be at least 90 percent self-sufficient in wheat production. Eliminating domestic support would have the least effect in Brazil where support levels are lower than the other countries.

Shifting the Narrative

Hayes also noted that this study compares future scenarios to data from a market situation in which wheat cash prices were significantly higher than they are now. For example, in addition to Chinese government input subsidies coupled to wheat production, the DTB Associates study in 2014 showed Chinese farmers have government minimum support prices of more than $10.00 per bushel.

“Wheat prices have plummeted more than 30 percent since last year, a significant portion of which is due to these countries’ market distorting policies, which send the wrong signals to their farmers. This hurts American family farms like mine even more,” said Brett Blankenship, who grows soft white wheat near Washtucna, Wash., and is the current President of the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG).

Referring to current negotiations in the Doha round, Blankenship added, “It is totally unacceptable to tolerate demands from countries who are in violation of their WTO commitments, who continue with these huge levels of support while demanding concessions from the United States. The American wheat farmer will not give away any more.”

WTO records show that the United States has consistently met its commitments, never exceeding its Aggregate Measure of Support (AMS) limit of $19.1 billion. But other country’s proposals made as part of the Doha round would require the United States to drastically cut its limit, while members with growing programs would not be expected to make meaningful contributions. Deputy U.S. Trade Representative Amb. Michael Punke has called this a “mind-boggling imbalance” that firmly underpins the U.S. position that it is critical to put facts on the table for a frank discussion about the real dynamic of world agricultural production and trade.

The new study indicated that wheat farmers outside of the four countries analyzed would benefit by reducing domestic supports. Hayes said the model showed global wheat cash prices would increase by more than four percent and world net trade would increase by five percent if domestic support is removed in all four countries. The study suggested that there would be benefits even from partial changes in price supports and input subsidies, although Hayes said the magnitude of the cash price and trade increase would depend on the size of the removal in each country.

“Since these subsidies are the acts of sovereign governments, our farmers cannot battle them alone. We are working with USTR and USDA to determine our next steps, including a possible WTO challenge,” Tracy concluded.

USW and NAWG have posted the entire report online at www.uswheat.org/policy and https://www.wheatworld.org/issues/trade/. Results of the two DTB Associates studies measuring domestic support in advanced developing countries, visit www.dtbassociates.com/docs/DomesticSupportStudy11-2014.pdf and www.dtbassociates.com/docs/domesticsupportstudy.pdf. For a third party analysis of individual policy measures by country, visit https://www.oecd.org/tad/agricultural-policies/producerandconsumersupportestimatesdatabase.htm#country.

USW is the wheat industry’s export market development organization working to promote all six classes of U.S. wheat in more than 100 countries. Its activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. For more information, visit our website at www.uswheat.org.

NAWG is a federation of 22 state wheat grower associations that works to represent the needs and interests of wheat producers before Congress and federal agencies. Based in Washington, D.C., NAWG is grower-governed and grower-funded, and works in areas as diverse as federal farm policy, trade, environmental regulation, agricultural research and sustainability.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — As part of a biennial Agricultural Trade Goodwill Mission to the United States to purchase grains and other agricultural products for the people of Taiwan, the Taiwan Flour Millers Association (TFMA) will be in Washington, DC, Sept. 16, 2015, to sign a letter of intent to purchase U.S. wheat in marketing years 2015/16 and 2016/17.

TFMA imports wheat on behalf of all 20 Taiwanese flour mills and has been a loyal customer of U.S. wheat producers for many years. U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) President Alan Tracy and current TFMA Executive Director Shin-Yao Lin, chief executive officer of Top Food Flour Mill in Taipei, Taiwan, will co-sign the letter.

Delegates from TFMA will start their visit to the United States as honored guests of the Idaho Wheat Commission at the Lewiston Roundup Rodeo Sept. 12. The entire mission’s visit to Washington, DC, includes a welcome reception at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a reception Sept. 15, 2015, with the signing ceremony the next day at the U.S. Capitol. Taiwan industry representatives will also sign letters of intent with U.S. Grains Council and the American Soybean Association. The entire delegation will also call on members of the U.S. Congress and policy makers in the executive branch.

After completing formal activities in Washington, DC, the flour millers continue their part of the mission Sept. 17 with visits to Kansas, Montana and Washington to meet with state wheat commission and government representatives before returning to Taiwan Sept. 23

Tracy said the U.S. wheat industry always looks forward to this event and appreciates the long history of mutually beneficial trade relations with the Taiwan milling and wheat foods industry.

“U.S. wheat farmers have maintained a trade office in Taipei since 1966,” Tracy said. “We are proud of that and also quite proud that USW Country Director Ron Lu has been a faithful part of that service for more than 33 years. We want to thank our customers at TFMA for importing significantly more U.S. wheat than the 1.7 million metric tons in the agreement signed in 2013.”

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat producers and their customers.” USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 18 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by FAS. USW maintains 17 offices strategically located around the world to help wheat buyers, millers, bakers, wheat food processors and government officials understand the quality, value and reliability of all six classes of U.S. wheat.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — It makes sense that Caribbean countries import most of their wheat from its nearby neighbor, the United States, but changes in the milling industry present new opportunities to reach even more markets in the region. Four current and potential wheat buyers from Guyana, Haiti, St. Vincent and Trinidad will travel the week of Aug. 16 to visit North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Louisiana to learn more about U.S. wheat quality and its supply system. U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) is sponsoring this team visit in cooperation with its state wheat commission members and USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS).

“These are senior managers in their milling operations, but they are either new to the industry or have a history of purchasing wheat from competing origins,” said Chad Weigand, USW assistant regional manager, Mexico City, Mexico, who will travel with the team. “The farmers, wheat merchandizers and federal grain inspectors the millers will meet on this trip will share many reasons why U.S. wheat should be their primary supply.”

Weigand said this visit supports an opportunity for growth and to overcome challenges in the region from new flour mills. The team includes a representative from a new mill in Haiti that started operating only in the past year, as well as a manager from St. Vincent whose mill will soon have to compete with a new mill on the island of St. Lucia that will likely use French wheat. His participation will allow him to discuss opportunities with suppliers to ship to multiple destinations in the Caribbean.

“Building knowledge and confidence in the U.S. supply system has been a successful strategy,” Weigand said. “We invited the general manager of a Trinidad flour mill who has been in the industry for just one year to participate in the team. And, based on several years of trade and technical service by USW, the Guyana executive on the team is transitioning to U.S. hard red spring (HRS) after purchasing Canadian spring wheat for many years.”

Weigand also noted that this will be the first USW-sponsored wheat buyer team to visit the new export grain terminal in the Port of Lake Charles, LA, now operated by the international commodities company Tradiverse. The Lake Charles facility, which includes a grain cleaning system, is the first new export terminal built in the U.S. Gulf tributary in 30 years.

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat producers and their customers.” USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS).

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the United States – +1-605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — The southeast Asian wheat market is a story of success for the U.S. wheat industry. In the 2014/15 marketing year (June to May), the region accounted for 20 percent of global U.S. wheat sales. With a strong milling industry to support it, the Philippine wheat market continues to be one of the region’s most consistent and important export markets year after year. In 2014/15, the Philippines was the third largest buyer of U.S. wheat and the second largest buyer of both soft white (SW) and hard red spring (HRS) wheat, setting a new sales record for the second year in a row.

Looking forward, the Philippine milling industry is going through transitions including an expansion of new mills and a new generation of management. Building on more than 50 years of service in the Philippines, U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) is playing a role in these transitions and further strengthening its relationships, including by hosting four milling industry customers on a visit to the United States Aug. 2 to 12, 2015.

“This is a trade team of emerging leaders that represent growing market trends in the Philippines,” said USW South Asia Assistant Regional Vice President Joe Sowers, who is traveling with the team. “We invited participants that we think will best apply what they learn on the trip to the challenges and opportunities presented by the evolving market environment.”

USW worked with the North Dakota Wheat Commission, Montana Wheat and Barley Committee, Washington Grain Commission, Idaho Wheat Commission and Oregon Wheat Commission to organize this team. While visiting these states, the team will get an on-farm look at the SW, HRS and hard red winter (HRW) wheat crops, and an early report on the 2015 crop quality outlook. The trip also includes tours of wheat breeding research, shuttle and barge loading facilities and export elevators, as well as to observe activities performed by the Federal Grain Inspection Service (FGIS) to assure adherence to contracted quality specifications.

“Our purpose is to demonstrate how the quality, value and reliability of U.S. wheat and its supply chain can help these millers grow their own businesses,” said Sowers.

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat producers and their customers.” USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. USW maintains 17 offices strategically located around the world to help wheat buyers, millers, bakers, wheat food processors and government officials understand the quality, value and reliability of all six classes of U.S. wheat.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — Algerians enjoy their bread and couscous. The North African nation is one of the world’s largest wheat importers. To help overcome an historical preference for French soft bread wheat, U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) will bring two officials from the Algerian Office of Cereals (OAIC) to the United States July 25 to Aug. 1, 2015, to learn about U.S. durum and bread wheat crop quality and the U.S. wheat export supply system. USW worked with the California Wheat Commission (CWC), the North Dakota Wheat Commission (NDWC) and the Minnesota Wheat Research and Promotion Council (MWRPC) to organize this team.

“There is an opportunity to foster demand for U.S. wheat to blend with Algerian standard flour,” said Ian Flagg, USW’s Regional Director for the Middle East, East and North Africa, who will travel with the team. “The goal of this visit is to demonstrate the versatility and quality of U.S. bread wheat classes and reinforce the value of U.S. durum wheats for semolina.”

The team starts its visit in Washington, DC, with meetings at USDA and USW. Janice Cooper, executive director of the California Wheat Commission, will join the team there to review Desert Durum® quality and supply. The schedule will continue in North Dakota and Minnesota where the team will see each all the components of the supply chain for both durum and bread wheats, including farm and grain elevator tours. They will also meet with university wheat breeders and get an in-depth look at the U.S. wheat transportation systems.

Flagg said bringing OAIC officials to the United States complements USW’s trade service and technical assistance in Algeria. That work, conducted with funds from USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) market development programs, plays a pivotal role in proving the value and comparable performance of U.S. wheat to produce flour for baguette bread and other products as well as semolina for couscous in Algeria.

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat producers and their customers.” USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the United States – +1-605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — Two executives representing Korean flour milling companies will chase combines in the Palouse region of Washington and the Columbia Valley of Oregon July 26 to Aug.1, 2015, to get a first look at this year’s wheat crop. Their visit, which includes a stop in Portland, OR, to learn more about the U.S. wheat supply system, is sponsored by U.S. Wheat Associates (USW), the Washington Grain Commission and the Oregon Wheat Commission.

The guests are Mr. Ha Jae Lee, who is the factory managing director of Daehan Flour Mills Co., Ltd., and Mr. Jeom Dae Kim, who is the managing director of Samwha Flour Mills Co., Ltd. Their guide is Chang Yoon Kang, USW country director based in Seoul, Korea, who said they hope to see soft white (SW), hard red winter (HRW) and possibly hard red spring (HRS) wheat being harvested.

“These are buyers for a market that is increasingly sophisticated so it is very important that they see this year’s crops,” Kang said. “Gaining a better understanding of the entire wheat chain, from the farm to the export elevator, will also help give them greater confidence in U.S. wheat supplies.”

In marketing year 2014/15 (June to May) Korea’s millers imported more than 43.3 million bushels of U.S. SW, HRS and HRW wheat sourced from Pacific Northwest and northern plains fields. While Korean millers import most of their wheat from the United States, Canadian spring wheat is also imported to blend with U.S. classes for bread flour. Australian white wheat is preferred for Korean style noodles, but USW is working to flank that market by helping its customers introduce whole wheat products made with flour from U.S. wheat as a healthy noodle choice.

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat producers and their customers.” USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS).

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the United States – +1-605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.