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Variable growing conditions greatly influenced the 2020 U.S. hard red winter (HRW) wheat crop. In areas with favorable growing conditions, record yields resulted in lower protein but excellent test weights and kernel characteristics, while regional swings in temperature and moisture led to lower yields with higher protein. The result is a crop that has generally outstanding kernel characteristics with flour, dough and bake quality attributes equal to or better than last year and many of the 5-year averages. Overall, the 2020 HRW crop can be characterized as clean and sound with good milling and processing characteristics, providing customers with an exceptionally good range of quality and value.

U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) has posted the full 2020 Hard Red Winter Regional Report on its website here, as well as the 2020 California Hard Red Winter Regional Report here.

USDA estimates the 2020 HRW planted area was again near historic 100-year lows, continuing the trend of recent years. Total HRW production is estimated at 17.9 MMT (695 mil bu), a 4.8 MMT (174 mil bu) decrease from 2019. Growing conditions varied among the HRW production regions.

  • The western Central and Southern Great Plains experienced insufficient moisture, freeze events and high temperatures during key stages of crop development, resulting in lower yields and kernel size, but higher protein.
  • The eastern Central and Southern Great Plains experienced favorable growing conditions resulting in record yields and very good kernel characteristics, but lower protein.
  • The Northern Great Plains and Pacific Northwest also experienced variable growing conditions. Washington, Montana and South Dakota harvested crops are equal to or better than average with very good kernel characteristics and protein. However, Oregon experienced a significant reduction in yield due to unseasonably dry weather.

With very few exceptions disease and insects were not a major issue for the 2020 HRW crop.

Here are highlights of data from the 2020 HRW wheat crop.

 

Wheat and Grade Data:

  • Grade – the overall average is U.S. No. 2 or better.
  • Test Weight average of 61.4 lb/bu (80.8 kg/hl) is above 2019 and the 5-year averages.
  • Dockage, total defects and foreign material averages are all equal to or similar to 2019 and the 5-year averages.
  • Wheat Protein (11.9%, 12% mb) and shrunken and broken (1.1%) are above 2019 and the 5-year averages.
  • 1000 Kernel Weight averages at 31.2 g, which is less than 2019 but higher than the 5-year average.
  • Wheat Falling Number – Average of 369 sec, indicative of sound wheat.

 

Flour and Baking Data:

  • Laboratory Mill Flour Extraction average is 73.5%, lower than the 2019 and 5-year averages of 74.5% and 75.4%, respectively.
  • Flour Ash levels of 0.49% (14% mb) is comparable to last year but lower than the 5-year average.
  • Alveograph W value of 261(10-4 J) is significantly higher than last year and the 5-year averages.
  • Farinograph peak and stability times, 5.3 and 10.3 min, respectively, are higher than the 2019 and the 5-year averages. Average bake absorption is 63.1%, also above the value for 2019 and the 5-year average.
  • Loaf volume averaged 859 cc, comparable to last year’s and the 5-year averages.

Buyers are encouraged to review their quality specifications to ensure that their purchases meet their expectations.


View other summaries of the 2020 U.S. wheat crop:
Hard Red Spring
Hard White
Soft White
Soft Red Winter
Durum

View the full 2020 U.S. Crop Quality Report and other related resources here.

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U.S. wheat farm families grow six distinct classes of wheat across the diverse landscape of the United States. Those farmers take great care in producing the highest quality wheat in the most sustainable ways possible to honor their family legacies and to ensure greater value for their customers at home and abroad. Behind the world’s most reliable supply of wheat are the world’s most dependable people.


The Padget Family: Padget Ranches sits on the arid Columbia Plateau above the John Day River in Oregon, where Darren Padget’s family has farmed since 1910. Today, Darren farms with his wife Brenda and their son Logan, as well as his dad Dale, a retired wheat farmer who participated in his 68th wheat harvest in 2020. Their dryland wheat and summer fallow rotation currently produces registered and certified seed on 3,400 acres annually.

Location: Grass Valley, Ore.
Classes of Wheat Grown:  Soft White (SW)
Leadership: Darren Padget: 2020/21 Chairman, U.S. Wheat Associates; Commissioner, Oregon Wheat Commission; Past President, Oregon Wheat Growers League; Past Chair, National Association of Wheat Growers Research and Technology Committee; Past Officer, Mid-Columbia Producers Board of Directors.


View other videos and stories in this series:

Stories from the Wheat Farm – The Next Generation in Kansas
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Loving the Work in Ohio
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Committed to Stewardship in Washington
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Living with Purpose in North Dakota
Stories from the Wheat Farm – A Passion for the Land in Oklahoma

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The 2020 Desert Durum® crop will again deliver the valuable milling, semolina and pasta quality traits that customers have learned to expect and appreciate.

Desert Durum® is a registered certification mark owned jointly by the Arizona Grain Research and Promotion Council (AGRPC) and the California Wheat Commission (CWC). The mark certifies or is intended to certify that grain so named is at least 90 percent wheat grain produced under irrigation in the desert valleys and lowlands of Arizona or California.

Before providing details on the new crop Desert Durum® quality, here is a look back by AGRPC Executive Director Allan B. Simons at how this unique and valuable commodity evolved into the identity preserved product it is today.

Historical Perspective

Arizona and California farmers grew durum wheat widely in the decades before 1980. However, the varieties available at the time generally possessed such mediocre milling and semolina flour qualities that this “desert durum” suffered a rather poor reputation among both domestic and foreign semolina millers and pasta makers. Therefore, much of this production was consigned to livestock feed.

Somewhat better quality durum varieties were being grown and even exported by the early 1980s. However, a cross between several northern durum varieties and two high-producing desert varieties, performed by a private cereal breeding firm in 1976 serendipitously produced a line possessing such superior color and pasta quality traits that it was introduced to a major Italian pasta company in 1980/81. The Italian firm began importing this durum, first in containers before moving to cargo ship holds. The variety was awarded a plant variety protection certificate in 1982 and occupied significant crop acreage in Arizona and the Imperial Valley of California by 1983. This variety, with its very desirable qualities, represented the first in a long and continuing line of high-quality durum varieties adapted to the southwestern U.S. deserts now known as Desert Durum®. These varieties are developed and released by Arizona’s private breeding programs to be sold both domestically and overseas.

Arizona Desert Durum® variety trial plots.

About half of annual Desert Durum® production in Arizona and California has been exported for many years, with Italy as the perennial leading export destination. One reason for Italy’s continued purchase of Desert Durum® is its valued semolina quality traits, allowing Italian pasta makers to maintain quality standards as they deal with typically variable grain quality from other sources.

Arizona wheat growers possess very little grain storage capability, so most of the annual Desert Durum® crop is grown to be “identity preserved,” a program by which the grower plants certified seed purchased from the grain handler that will eventually purchase the crop. The grain crops are harvested, delivered and stored by variety for future shipment to fill existing or future customer orders. Also, the handlers continually remind growers of the critical need to maintain production practices needed to achieve the expected quality standards for Desert Durum®. Grain handler representatives annually discuss varietal traits, production conditions, prices, shipping realities and other factors with customers. They also work with U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) representatives to support and inform potential Desert Durum® buyers.

Sustainability Metrics

Some domestic and overseas customers of Desert Durum® have adopted certain “sustainability metrics” for their grain purchases that tend to cast an unfavorable reputation on small grains production in some environments. One of their negative metrics determines that wheat grown with substantial irrigation possesses a relatively high “water footprint,” defined as the quantity of water needed to produce a unit of grain.

The AGRPC recently commissioned a University of Arizona study that reviewed a wide range of the topic’s literature and production practices and environments that influence the metric. The study concluded that Arizona’s durum wheat production, as currently practiced, has a water footprint that is lower to much lower than evidenced in many other durum production regions. Furthermore, the report observes that the water footprint values stated or calculated for durum wheat production under Arizona’s conditions are over-stated on many sustainability websites. The report can be accessed on the following website under “2015 Project Reports”: https://agriculture.az.gov/arizona-grain-research-and-promotion-council-previously-funded-research-projects.

2020 Crop Quality

Desert Durum® crops in both Arizona and Southern California are grown under weather conditions and management practices that promote consistently favorable grain, milling, and semolina traits. These crops are seldom negatively affected by adverse weather events. The result is grain of consistently large low moisture kernels possessing very high hard amber durum counts and which yield high semolina extraction rates.

Desert Durum® production acreage in 2020 was somewhat greater than in 2019. The combined results of Desert Durum® surveys conducted by the AGRPC and CWC reveals the following crop data. The average grade is No. 1 Hard Amber Durum (HAD). Test weight is 62.3 lb/bu (81.1 kg/hl). The average hard vitreous amber kernel content (HVAC) is 99.0%, a high average typical of Desert Durum®. Average damaged kernels are 0.2% and total defects are 0.6%. Desert Durum® is characterized by its low kernel moisture content and this year’s average is 6.9%. Protein content average is 14.5% (12% mb).

Semolina and Processing Data. The semolina extraction rate average across varieties is 71.1%. The semolina b* value is 32.7, higher than 2019 b* value of 29.2. Wet gluten is 34.7% and gluten index is 87. Semolina Mixograph score is 7 and Alveograph W value is 294 (10-4 J), both of which indicate high strength. Pasta color b* value is 43 and score is 9.6. Pasta cooked firmness is 7.4, higher than 2019.

Whole wheat durum pasta.

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U.S. wheat farm families grow six distinct classes of wheat across the diverse landscape of the United States. Those farmers take great care in producing the highest quality wheat in the most sustainable ways possible to honor their family legacies and to ensure greater value for their customers at home and abroad. Behind the world’s most reliable supply of wheat are the world’s most dependable people.


The Peters Family: Peters Farms is a family-owned operation that was started when Michael Peters’ great-great grandfather homesteaded a piece of land in central Oklahoma in the 1880s. Today, Michael farms with his father, Fred Peters, and his son Tyler. They grow hard red winter (HRW) wheat and graze cattle on some of that crop over the late fall and winter. Linda Peters, Michael’s wife, is a teacher and church musician who remains an active participant in the farm operations.

Location: Okarche, Okla.
Classes of Wheat Grown:  Hard Red Winter (HRW)
Leadership: Michael Peters: 2020/21 Secretary/Treasurer, U.S. Wheat Associates; Commissioner, Oklahoma Wheat Commission (OWC); Chair, USW Audit Committee; Past Chair, USW Wheat Quality Committee; member of the USW and National Association of Wheat Growers Joint International Trade Committee; Past President, St. John’s Lutheran Church; Past President, CHS Western Oklahoma Cooperative; member of Okarche Rural Fire Fighters’ Association Board.


View other videos and stories in this series:
Stories from the Wheat Farm – The Next Generation in Kansas
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Loving the Work in Ohio
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Committed to Stewardship in Washington
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Living with Purpose in North Dakota
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Committed to Wheat Quality in Oregon

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The world’s wheat buyers should be extremely happy with the quality of the entire 2020 U.S. soft red winter (SRW) crop. This year’s composite characteristics for East Coast supplies are very good with pockets of higher enzymatic activity (lower falling number) and Gulf Port supplies offer uniformly excellent characteristics.

U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) has posted the full Soft Red Winter Wheat 2020 Quality Survey on its website here.

USDA estimates the 2020 SRW seeded area at 5.63 million acres (2.28 million hectares), up slightly from 2019 but less than the 5-year average. After generally good growing conditions, harvest ended in some areas ahead of the five-year pace. Total SRW production, estimated at 277 million bushels or 7.54 million metric tons (MMT), is up 15% from 2019 but below the five-year average of 304 million bushels (8.28 MMT).

Great Plains Analytical Laboratory, Kansas City, Mo., collected and analyzed 191 samples from elevators in 18 reporting areas across 11 states. The number of samples collected this year is significantly less than in 2019 because of COVID-19 pandemic restrictions at country elevators. Test weight, moisture, protein, thousand kernel weight, wheat ash, falling number and DON were determined on individual samples; the remaining tests were determined on 18 composite samples.

Here are highlights of data from this very good, 2020 SRW wheat crop.

Wheat and Grade Data: 

  • Grade – the overall average is U.S. No. 2 SRW.
  • Test Weight for the Gulf Port average of 59.8 lb/bu (78.7 kg/hl) and East Coast test weight average of 59.3 lb/bu (78.0 kg/hl) are both higher than 2019 and 5-year averages.
  • Total Defects for the East Coast average of 1.5% is lower than last year but above the 5-year average. The Gulf Port average is 0.6%, significantly lower than 2019 and 5-year averages.
  • Dockage and moisture for both regions are lower than last year and 5-year average values.
  • Wheat Protein content for the Composite average of 9.4% (12% mb) is lower than last year and the 5-year average. The Gulf Port protein average of 9.4% is equal to 2019 but slightly below the 5-year average. The East Coast average of 9.4% is significantly below the 2019 and 5-year average.
  • Wheat Falling Number – The Gulf Port falling number averages are higher this year and indicate a sound crop. The East Coast average is equal to last year but lower than the 5-year average.
  • Vomitoxin (DON) averages for Composite (0.5. ppm), East Coast (0.2 ppm) and Gulf Port (0.6 ppm) are significantly below 2019 and 5-year averages, indicating that the crop sampled is relatively free of DON.

Flour and Baking Data: 

  • Laboratory Mill Flour Extraction for Composite (66.8%), East Coast (67.0%) and Gulf Port (66.7%) are below 2019 and the 5-year averages.
  • Dough properties – data suggest this crop has stronger protein qualities than last year; slightly less extensible and more resistant.
  • Farinograph peak and absorption values are similar to 5-year averages, but the stability values are all below the 5-year averages.
  • Alveograph L averages for Composite (78), East Coast (75) and Gulf Port (78) are lower than last year and the 5-year average and indicate low extensibility.
  • Amylograph Gulf Port average of 760 BU is significantly higher than last year and the 5-year average. The East Coast average of 322 BU indicates relatively high levels of amylase activity in the crop and is consistent with low falling numbers.
  • Solvent Retention Capacity (SRC) values generally indicate excellent quality for cookies, cakes, pretzels and crackers; sucrose values in particular indicate good performance.
  • Cookie spread ratios for Composite (10.2), East Coast (9.7) and Gulf Port (10.3) are all higher than last year and the 5-year averages, indicating good spreadability.
  • Loaf volume averages are significantly lower than last year and the 5-year averages, as the dough is relatively more resistant/less extensive

Buyers are encouraged to review their quality specifications to ensure that their purchases meet their expectations.


View other summaries of the 2020 U.S. wheat crop:
Hard Red Winter 
Hard Red Spring
Hard White
Soft White
Durum

View the full 2020 U.S. Crop Quality Report and other related resources here.

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U.S. wheat farm families grow six distinct classes of wheat across the diverse landscape of the United States. Those farmers take great care in producing the highest quality wheat in the most sustainable ways possible to honor their family legacies and to ensure greater value for their customers at home and abroad. Behind the world’s most reliable supply of wheat are the world’s most dependable people.


The Volk Family: Philip and Lisa Volk and their five children grow hard red spring (HRS) wheat on their family farm in North Dakota that was founded in 1942. Responsibilities are shared among them all, even their youngest who rides along with Mom or Dad during wheat harvest.

Location: York, N.D.
Classes of Wheat Grown:  Hard Red Spring (HRS)
Leadership: Philip Volk: Commissioner, North Dakota Wheat Commission (NDWC); USW Director; NDWC liaison to the Wheat Marketing Center; Chairman, SBARE Wheat Granting Committee.


View other videos and stories in this series:

Stories from the Wheat Farm – The Next Generation in Kansas
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Loving the Work in Ohio
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Committed to Stewardship in Washington
Stories from the Wheat Farm – A Passion for the Land in Oklahoma
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Committed to Wheat Quality in Oregon

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The North Dakota Wheat Commission (NDWC) and the U.S. Durum Growers Association (USDGA) held a virtual “Northern Durum Pre-Harvest Update” Aug. 18 featuring industry experts, farmers and university Extension workers reporting on the 2020 northern durum crop. The hosts recorded the session which is now posted on the USDGA YouTube channel here and on the NDWC event page here.

More than 60 participants heard first-hand accounts about what is expected to be a larger crop by about 12 percent compared to 2019, mainly from increased planted area. Yield and quality likely will vary because early planted fields in North Dakota did not get rain at the ideal time for growth and tillering, while later planted fields caught rain in late June into mid-July at the right time for development. Precipitation across Montana’s western durum production region was more timely and yield potential is expected to be more consistent there.

“USDA’s current forecast for North Dakota is 42.8 bushels per acre, which is above the trend line but less than in 2019,” said Jim Peterson, NDWC Policy and Marketing Director. “Production is estimated now at 62 million bushels, or 1.69 million metric tons, in the state.”

Sam Anderson, Industry Analyst and Marketing Coordinator with the Montana Wheat and Barley Committee, told the participants that farmers there are generally very pleased with their northern durum crops.

“There was more durum and hard red spring wheat seeded because of the extremely wet conditions last fall that kept farmers from putting in hard red winter wheat,” Anderson said. “As of Aug. 1, the average yield forecast is 38.0 bushels per acre, which would put the total production estimate in the state at 22.42 million bushels,” or more than 610,000 metric tons.

Farmers from across North Dakota also reported from their own fields. Mark Birdsall farms in Ward County and showed some later-seeded durum that has “a really good stand … tall with heavy heads,” that is about 3 weeks from maturity. His grandson Owen held plants from the field that stood close to his height of 5 feet (1.524 meters).

Mark Birdsall’s grandson Owen, who stands about 5 feet (1.524 meters) tall holds plants from a later seeded durum crop that almost match his height.

Blake Inman of Berthold, N.D., is USDGA’s President this year, and noted that his durum looked good, particularly the later-seeded fields. He expects to start his harvest in about 3 weeks but was somewhat concerned about variable maturity and late season weed growth that could cause challenges at harvest.

USDGA President and Berthold, N.D., farmer Blake Inman expects good yields from this northern durum field.

Adam Carney farms in Montana’s “Platinum Square,” as the northeast corner of the state is called. With plenty of timely rains, he says his durum “should provide a nice yield and quality.”

The northern durum harvest is currently underway and is a bit more advanced in Montana. U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) will soon begin reporting on northern durum quality as samples are collected and analyzed for USW’s 2020 Harvest Report.

 

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In 2019, U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) started a project to produce a video that focuses on the people who contribute to the wholesome quality of U.S. wheat for dozens of different food products around the world. Together with our creative partners, we traveled to Kansas, Ohio, Washington, North Dakota, Oklahoma and Oregon to capture the images and words of U.S. wheat farm families, and other participants along the supply chain, including wheat breeders, grain elevator managers, grain inspectors, exporters, and more. After a few delays, including COVID-19, a small team was recently able to travel to Montana, the final stop on our list, to visit with the Hucke family during harvest.

Angie and Will Hucke are third generation farmers and ranchers from Geraldine, about 40 miles (65 km) east of Great Falls in Montana’s “Golden Triangle,” where they grow winter wheat, spring wheat, hay barley and occasionally rotate in yellow peas. Previously, Angie had a corporate job and opted to leave that lifestyle to return to the family farm.

“I enjoyed working in the corporate world, I was able to learn from the most amazing women in that job,” said Angie. “But the office grind was hard for me, doing the same things day by day was not for me. I enjoy the new challenge that each day brings on the farm.”

Part of returning to the family farm meant being involved in their community and raising their kids, son, Arrow (11), and daughter, Jetta (9) in an environment where they learn about “hard work, taking pride in a job well down and learning that work can be fun.” This year, Arrow drove the grain cart – his first time being able to help with harvest, and it was clear how excited and proud he was. Both are very involved in 4-H, rodeo and helping with chores on the farm.

“The passion I have seen my kids develop for agriculture is what makes this so amazing,” said Angie.

 

Our team spoke with Angie about the importance of women in agriculture with hands-on roles and the obstacles faced when working on a multi-generational family farm.

“Communication is key, but often, that is the piece that is the hardest,” said Angie. “You also have to continually build trust and have a little faith that it is all going to work out.”

Along with being featured in USW’s video telling the story of the U.S. wheat supply chain – which is due to be published in a few weeks – the Hucke family will be featured in its own video as a part of the USW “Stories from the Wheat Farm” series. So far, USW has published three videos in that series – Kansas, Ohio, and Washington – and have videos from North Dakota, Oklahoma and Oregon scheduled to publish in the coming weeks.

USW wants to thank Montana Wheat and Barley Committee Executive Vice President Cassidy Marn for her help arranging our visit. And thank you to the Hucke family for giving their time and effort to share their story at one of their busiest, but most hopeful, times of the year.

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U.S. wheat farm families grow six distinct classes of wheat across the diverse landscape of the United States. Those farmers take great care in producing the highest quality wheat in the most sustainable ways possible to honor their family legacies and to ensure greater value for their customers at home and abroad. Behind the world’s most reliable supply of wheat are the world’s most dependable people.


The Bailey Family and LM Farms: After starting his career at a major farm lending institution, Gary Bailey left to join his family’s farm full-time in 1989, working alongside his parents and two brothers. He wanted to be a part of the legacy that his parents started and to give his children the same kind of upbringing that he had. Today, Gary works the farm’s 4,500 acres alongside his brother Mark and his niece Erin, the next generation.

Location: St. John, Washington (Whitman County)
Classes of Wheat Grown:  Soft White (SW); White Club
Leadership: Gary Bailey: Chairman, Washington Grain Commission; USW Director; Director, St. John Grain Growers (Whitgro); Local Advisory Committee, Northwest Farm Credit Services; Member, Washington State University Land Legacy Committee; and Director, St. John Telco.

 


View other videos and stories in this series:

Stories from the Wheat Farm – The Next Generation in Kansas
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Loving the Work in Ohio
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Living with Purpose in North Dakota
Stories from the Wheat Farm – A Passion for the Land in Oklahoma
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Committed to Wheat Quality in Oregon

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The North Dakota Wheat Commission (NDWC) and the North Dakota Grain Growers Association (NDGGA) brought the 2020 U.S. hard red spring (HRS/DNS) wheat crop to domestic and international stakeholders on July 28 via a “Virtual Hard Red Spring Wheat Pre-Harvest Update” on the Zoom platform.

Presentations from NDWC, farmers and university experts painted a picture of a variable crop across Montana, North and South Dakota and Minnesota that is about three weeks away from the height of harvest. Crop conditions run the gamut from excellent yield and quality potential to thin drought and heat stressed pockets and even water-logged fields in eastern production areas. The experts who reported on the crop generally agree that USDA’s current HRS yield forecast of 46.6 bushels per acre (bu/a) is “optimistic,” but should end up close to the long-term average yield of 45 bu/a.

Dr. Joel Ransom, North Dakota State University (NDSU) Extension Agronomist, told an estimated 211 participants on the virtual update that  farmers will see many good fields this year, but few will have “their best crop ever.” NDSU’s spring wheat breeder Dr. Andrew Green explained that farmers in the state are paying close attention to end-use qualities as well as yield potential when selecting varieties – and in their management.

“Functional quality and yields in North Dakota’s spring wheat production have both increased overall the past several years,” Dr. Green said. “We are seeing that higher yields and better quality are not mutually exclusive.”

In the Virtual HRS Pre-Harvest Update, Dr. Andrew Friskop, Extension Plant Pathologist, NDSU, described symptoms of a wheat disease called bacterial leaf streak to help farmer participants identify the disease. NDWC Market Development and Research Manager Erica Olson did a great job managing the challenges inherent in today’s virtual meetings.

Dennis Haugen farms in east central North Dakota and showed the participants a field with an estimated yield potential of around 75 bu/a.

“The problem in this area is that it has been so wet since last year, many fields were never planted,” he said, describing conditions that also prevail along the Red River in North Dakota and across the river into Minnesota.

“Northwest Minnesota has received up to three times our normal annual rainfall since 2019, so it was very challenging to get spring wheat seeded,” said Dr. Jochum Wiersma, Extension Small Grains Specialist at the University of Minnesota’s Crookston station. “In the fields that were planted, we are going to see yield loss and lower protein levels – if they can be harvested. We are asking for dry weather until November in our area.”

Planting conditions were better in South Dakota and farmers were able to seed 815,000 acres of spring wheat, which is 35 percent more than in 2019, said Reid Christopherson, Executive Director of the South Dakota Wheat Commission. The HRS harvest there is already about 10 percent complete.

Relatively cool conditions with good moisture has the Montana HRS crop in very good shape overall with the potential for high yields and good quality protein. Sam Anderson, Industry Analyst & Outreach Coordinator for the Montana Wheat & Barley Committee, reported that among spring wheat states, Montana has the highest rated crop conditions at 80 percent good to excellent.

NDWC Administrator Neal Fisher, NDGGA Executive Director Dan Wogsland and Wheat Quality Council Executive Vice President Dave Green each expressed thanks to all the participants and the folks who planned and managed the virtual pre-harvest update, and offered sincere hope that participants in the 2021 Wheat Quality Council’s spring wheat tour will be back in their vehicles checking fields along the traditional routes.