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ARLINGTON, Virginia — U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) welcomes Amanda Spoo as Communications Specialist in its Arlington, VA, headquarters effective March 9, 2015. Spoo will provide public relations and marketing communications support, specifically working to communicate the value of USW to stakeholder organizations.

“Amanda’s education and creative approach in her current position are ideal to support what we are doing to expand outreach to wheat farmers and their overseas customers,” said USW Vice President of Communications Steve Mercer. “We look forward to having Amanda join our growing base of young, talented associates.”

Spoo grew up in Hermiston, OR, and earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural communications and journalism at Kansas State University. She gained valuable experience in the grain industry by working three years as a Student Communications Specialist at the IGP Institute and also worked as a Communications Intern in Government Affairs with ICM, Inc., a Kansas biofuels company. Spoo was an active member of Agriculture Future of America, serving on its student advisory team. Over the past two years, Spoo managed a broad range of strategic producer communications and consumer outreach projects as Director of Communications at the Kansas Pork Association.

USW is the wheat industry’s export market development organization working to promote all six classes of U.S. wheat in more than 100 countries. Its activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service.

Amanda Spoo

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — Several influential countries are not complying with the domestic agricultural support commitments they made as members of the World Trade Organization (WTO). That is the conclusion of a study sponsored by U.S. commodity organizations and introduced to agricultural negotiators Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland. Those organizations made the point that recognizing the current realities in agricultural support and trade could help improve the chances of finally reaching a Doha Round agreement.

The study was conducted by DTB Associates, Washington, DC, and updates a similar study conducted in 2011. U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) was one of the sponsors of the latest study indicating that the governments of India, China, Turkey, Brazil and Thailand have dramatically increased trade distorting subsidies for wheat, corn or rice production over the past ten years to levels that exceed their WTO agreements — in most cases by large margins. That information has not been readily available to WTO negotiators.

“U.S. wheat farmers strongly support the goals of the WTO and the Doha Round,” said USW President Alan Tracy. “We also believe every WTO member must follow the rules. Sadly, the facts we have uncovered show this is not the case.”

Member countries are required to report their domestic support levels to WTO regularly, but more than 650 notifications were late as of November 2014, Tracy noted. Turkey has not reported its support since its 2001 crop year. China has not reported since 2008 and India just submitted a notification last fall covering seven crop years to make them current through 2010. However, the study demonstrates that even notifications that have been reported often rely on faulty methodology.

“This study shines a light on what is really happening,” said USW Vice President of Policy Shannon Schlecht. “What it shows is a massive increase in government-sanctioned support prices and violations of Aggregate Measure of Support agreements that are distorting world trade in wheat, corn and rice.”

The dramatic increases in current support price levels by country and commodity in the study are clear and most revealing when compared with reference prices in the United States (see “Support Price Levels).

*Reference Price, Agricultural Act of 2014
**Support price under the Paddy Pledging Scheme
Note: China and Brazil wheat reflect 2014/15 support price levels

The minimum government prices reported in the study indicated a significant increase in support for wheat production in these countries over the past several years. Since the original study in 2011, a few countries increased their minimum support price for wheat by $50 to $100 per metric ton.

Under the Uruguay Round Agreement of the mid 1990s, WTO member countries agreed to abide by limits on Aggregate Measure of Support (AMS). The DTB study showed India, China, Turkey and Thailand have exceeded their AMS commitments by a wide margin (See “Aggregate Measure of Support”). WTO records show that the United States has always met its annual notification commitment and has never exceeded its AMS limit of $19.1 billion.

Aggregate Measure of Support (AMS)
2013/14 and 2014/15
Billion U.S. Dollars
Country Wheat Corn Rice Other Total AMS Limit
China $15.5 – $18.4 $20.6 – $54.4 $12.4 – $37.0 NA $48.4 – $109.8 $0
India $12.4 – $15.8 $2.5 – $3.8 $13.3 – $28.2 $33.0 $36.1 – 93.4 $0
Brazil $0.8 01 $0.6 NA $1.4 $0.912
Turkey $5.7 $1.0 $0.3 NA $7.0 $0
Thailand NA $0.5 $1.4 – 10.1 NA $1.9 – $10.6 $0.634
1 Support below de minimis level

The fact that these countries have far exceeded their WTO support commitments leads to serious trade distortions. An insightful example may be found in the Indian government’s wheat production and trade policies.

The study determined that India’s minimum support price for wheat increased by 111 percent between 2005/06 and 2013/14. India recently notified the WTO of a much lower increase but the study showed that the Indian government used faulty tactics to calculate the number it reported, a number that many other WTO members have questioned.

Increasing support levels gave Indian farmers an artificial incentive to produce more wheat. In fact, India’s wheat production increased by 35 percent over those seven years to record levels. That buoyed world wheat supplies and increased pressure on prices that hurt wheat farmers in other countries.

Over the same time, Indian wheat exports increased from 300,000 metric tons (MT) to 6.5 million MT. The study also included evidence that India is offering wheat export subsidies that are also illegal under its WTO commitment. Yet, claiming it must maintain a large public stockpile of grain to maintain food security as an advanced developing country, India has demanded exemptions to its trade-distorting levels of support.

“We agree with our U.S. agricultural negotiators that we see no possibility of concluding the Doha agreement by pursuing the same approach used over the last decade,” Schlecht said. “Hopefully the facts in the study will help raise awareness of the current realities of trade-distorting farm subsidies. Without this information it will be impossible for WTO members to achieve a balanced Doha Round conclusion across the domestic support, market access and export competition pillars.”

For more information, visit www.dtbassociates.com/docs/DomesticSupportStudy11-2014.pdf and www.dtbassociates.com/docs/domesticsupportstudy.pdf.

USW is the wheat industry’s export market development organization working to promote all six classes of U.S. wheat in more than 100 countries. Its activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. For more information, visit our website at www.uswheat.org.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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WASHINGTON, D.C. – On Feb. 12, 2015, a bipartisan group of lawmakers led by Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) introduced major legislation that would end the U.S. trade embargo of Cuba. The bill would end the restrictions on U.S. companies doing business in Cuba that have been in place since 1961. Senators Mike Enzi (R-WY), Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Patrick Leahy (D-VT), and Dick Durbin (D-IL) co-sponsored the bill.

NAWG and USW are pleased to see bipartisan Congressional progress being made, and look toward a speedy and permanent end to the Cuban trade embargo. NAWG and USW are members of the U.S. Agricultural Coalition for Cuba, which also endorsed the legislation.

“It is refreshing to see our nation’s lawmakers reaching across the aisle to produce real and meaningful change. Increased trade with Cuba has great potential for U.S. wheat growers,” commented NAWG president Paul Penner.

Cuba’s 11 million people consume close to one million metric tons of wheat each year. It is the largest wheat market in the Caribbean, but it currently purchases almost all of that wheat from the European Union and Canada. Cuba could import at least 500,000 metric tons of wheat from the United States each year but has not purchased U.S. wheat since 2011. Under the current embargo, the United States can export agricultural products to Cuba through the use of third-party banking institutions, which makes facilitating trade burdensome and often more expensive.

“The farmer directors of NAWG and USW recently renewed a call to end the Cuban trade embargo,” said USW President Alan Tracy. “We support the bipartisan effort in the Senate that moves us one step closer to seeing U.S. wheat flowing to our Cuban neighbors again.”

USW is the wheat industry’s export market development organization working to promote all six classes of U.S. wheat in more than 100 countries. Its activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — Rapidly changing international trade policies increasingly influence world wheat market opportunities. Recognizing the need for additional resources, U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) announces that Dalton Henry will join the organization in March 2015 as Director of Policy. Henry is currently Director of Government Affairs for Kansas Wheat, the cooperative agreement between the Kansas Wheat Commission and Kansas Association of Wheat Growers.

“I am very pleased with the talented trade policy team working for U.S. wheat farmers to increase market access and monitor previous trade commitments,” said USW President Alan Tracy. “Dalton’s commitment to our industry and experience managing these and other issues for a major wheat producing state organization will add a lot of strength to that effort.”

“It is exciting to continue working on behalf of our country’s wheat farmers as part of the USW policy team,” Henry said. “They have a great track record of producing results and I look forward to helping move the trade policy agenda forward.”

Henry joined Kansas Wheat in 2010 and has been responsible for implementing policies for the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and managing the association’s membership function, including member retention, programming, meetings and communications. He has also been the association’s primary contact for Congressional offices, state agencies and agricultural organizations.

A May 2010 graduate of Kansas State University (K-State), Henry earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural communications and journalism, emphasizing in agricultural economics. He grew up on and is still involved with a diversified crop and livestock operation near Randolph, KS. He was involved in 4-H and FFA, and was elected president of the Kansas FFA Association in 2006. Henry had a distinguished college career, serving on several student government committees and as Student Body President in 2009/10. He was a member of the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity and served in the College of Agriculture Ambassadors and as a charter member of the Collegiate Farm Bureau chapter at K-State.

USW is the wheat industry’s export market development organization working to promote all six classes of U.S. wheat in more than 100 countries. Its activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service.

Dalton Henry

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) farmer directors elected officers for the 2015/16 (July to June) fiscal year at their board meeting in Washington, DC, Saturday, Jan. 31, 2015. Mike Miller of Ritzville, WA, was elected to serve as Secretary-Treasurer. Current Vice Chairman Brian O’Toole of Crystal, ND, was elected Chairman and current Secretary-Treasurer Jason Scott of Stevensville, MD, was elected Vice Chairman. Current Chairman Roy Motter of Brawley, CA, will become Past Chairman. The new USW officers begin their one-year terms in July 2015 at the organization’s annual meeting in San Diego, CA.

“I see the opportunities and challenges ahead for the wheat industry through the eyes of my kids,” Miller said. “What we do over the next few years will affect the next generation the most. I’m excited about working in a leadership position to help meet those needs and to maintain or grow new overseas markets for U.S. wheat.”

Miller is a fourth generation farmer who operates a dryland wheat farm and grows multiple crops on a separate, irrigated farm in east central Washington. He has served on many local, state and national boards, and is in his second term on the Washington Grain Commission and his fourth year as a USW director representing Washington. Miller is also very active in supporting wheat research and development. He and his wife, Marci, have three children: Lacey, 14; Spencer, 12 and Cooper, 10.

Brian O’Toole is an experienced agricultural and community leader. He serves on the North Dakota Wheat Commission, on the board of the Wheat Marketing Center in Portland, OR, and is Chairman of SBARE Wheat Granting Committee. He is also past president of the North Dakota Crop Improvement and Seed Association and past president of Crystal Farmers Elevator Co-op. O’Toole has received the Young Outstanding Farmer Award, Master Farmer Award and Friends of 4-H Award.

Jason Scott is at least a sixth-generation wheat farmer from the Eastern Shore of Maryland, where he manages his family’s soft red winter (SRW) wheat, row crop and vegetable operation. He also owns and operates a Pioneer Hi-Bred® seed dealership with his father. Scott has been a member of the Maryland Grain Producers Utilization Board since 2003 and served as president from 2005 to 2007. Scott received the Maryland Young Farmer Achievement Award in 2011. In his six years on the USW Board of Directors, Scott has represented his state and USW on two board team delegations to Africa and Europe.

Roy Motter is managing partner of Spruce Farms, LLC, a diverse operation in California’s Imperial Valley that produces Desert Durum®, lettuce, cabbage, onions, sugar beets, sugar cane, alfalfa seed and hay, sudan grass, melons and tomatoes. He has been a member of the California Wheat Commission since 1998.

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service.

Header Photo Caption: U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) directors elected officers for 2015-16 (July to June) during their board meeting Jan. 31, 2015, in Washington, DC. USW officer team includes (left to right) President Alan Tracy; current Secretary-Treasurer Jason Scott, Stevensville, MD, who was elected Vice Chairman; newly elected Secretary-Treasurer Mike Miller, Ritzville, WA; current Vice Chairman Brian O’Toole, Crystal, ND, who was elected Chairman; and current Chairman Roy Motter, Brawley, CA, who will become Past Chairman. The new USW officers officially begin one-year terms in July at the organization’s annual meeting in San Diego, CA.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, USW, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. USW is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) announces changes to its leadership team in Asia following the departure of Regional Vice President Mike Spier who recently joined Columbia Grain as Southeast Asia Representative.

Matt Weimar is named Regional Vice President for South Asia and will relocate to USW’s regional office in Singapore after many years of service in Hong Kong as Regional Vice President for China. In addition to supervising staff and directing strategic planning and activities in USW’s 32-nation South Asia region, Weimar will continue to supervise USW activities in China and Taiwan. He will be assisted by Joe Sowers who is promoted to a new position as Assistant Regional Vice President. Sowers will continue to work from USW’s office in Manila, Philippines, but with new responsibilities now including supervisory and marketing support for USW activities in Korea.

“Both Matt and Joe have earned the trust of their customers and colleagues over many years of work on behalf of U.S. wheat farmers, and we are confident they will be very successful in their new positions,” said USW Vice President of Overseas Operations Vince Peterson. “Not wanting to squander his 30 years of work in China, Matt will stay engaged with customers there.”

Weimar started with USW as country director in the Beijing office in 1987 and was assigned as regional director in 1993 in the Hong Kong office. Weimar hails from a wheat and cattle ranch near Arlington, OR, where he worked in his family’s business and helped manage adjacent wheat and cattle ranches. Weimar received a bachelor’s degree in agricultural and resource economics from Oregon State University in 1982, graduating with high honors after being named both outstanding undergraduate and senior in OSU’s College of Agriculture. His other work experience includes marketing livestock feeds and supplements for Loomix, Inc., and value-added product promotion in Asian markets for the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

Sowers joined USW in 2005 as a market analyst in Washington, DC, and earned a promotion to senior market analyst before moving to the USW office in Mexico City as assistant regional director with responsibility for Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central America. In 2011 he was transferred to his most recent post as assistant regional director for South Asia in Manila. He earned a bachelor’s degree in agronomy and a master’s degree in agricultural economics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. From 2000 to 2004 Sowers analyzed global grain and oilseed markets with the economic consulting firm, Global Insight, stationed in Philadelphia and Barcelona, Spain.

USW is the wheat industry’s export market development organization working to promote all six classes of U.S. wheat in more than 100 countries. Its activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service.

Joe Sowers

Matt Weimar

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) and the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) are pleased to be founding members of the U.S. Agricultural Coalition for Cuba (USACC). The organizations are encouraged by President Obama’s efforts to renew diplomatic relations with Cuba. However, it is unclear if these actions alone will be enough to restore the Cuban wheat market for U.S. farmers. That is why they share USACC’s mission to re-establish Cuba as a market for U.S. food and agricultural exports.

Cuba, which does not grow wheat commercially, is the largest wheat market in the Caribbean, purchasing almost all of its wheat from the European Union and Canada. In the recent past, Cuba has imported more than 16.3 million bushels (445,000 metric tons) of wheat in a single year from the United States, sales that today would represent a value of nearly $123 million. However, under current rules set by the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control, the United States can only export agricultural products to Cuba through the use of third-party, foreign banks, which makes facilitating trade burdensome and often more expensive for Cuba. Partly as a result, Cuba has not purchased U.S. wheat since 2011.

“U.S. wheat farmers are excited about the prospect of exporting more wheat to Cuba,” says NAWG President Paul Penner, a wheat farmer from Hillsboro, KS. “NAWG has long supported strengthened trade relations with Cuba and see this as a historic step in that direction.”

“The U.S. wheat industry applauds these efforts to normalize trade relations, which take concrete steps away from a policy approach towards Cuba that has accomplished little,” said USW President Alan Tracy. “If U.S. trade with Cuba can increasingly respond to economics rather than politics, we believe our wheat market share there will eventually grow from its current level of zero to around 80 to 90 percent, as it is in other Caribbean nations. We have a natural competitive advantage over other suppliers.”

USW is the industry’s market development organization working in more than 100 countries. Its mission is to “develop, maintain, and expand international markets to enhance the profitability of U.S. wheat farmers.” The activities of USW are made possible by producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and through cost-share funding provided by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. For more information, visit www.uswheat.org or contact your state wheat commission.

The National Association of Wheat Growers was founded more than 60 years ago by producers who wanted to work together for the common good of the industry. Today, NAWG works with its 22 affiliated state associations and many coalition partners on issues as diverse as federal farm policy, environmental regulation, the future commercialization of biotechnology in wheat and uniting the wheat industry around common goals.

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, USW, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. USW is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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ARLINGTON, Virginia — U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) announces the addition of two new technical service representatives. Shin Hak (David) Oh joins as Food/Bakery Technologist in the USW office in Seoul, Korea, and Tarik Gahi joins as Milling and Baking Technologist serving markets in the Middle East and North Africa from the USW office in Casablanca, Morocco. USW is the wheat industry’s export market development organization working to promote all six classes of U.S. wheat in more than 100 countries.

“I am delighted to welcome Shin Hak to our team in Korea,” said Chang Yoon Kang, USW country director. “He has excellent skills and experience in research and product development that will be very valuable to our Korean customers and U.S. wheat farmers.”

Most recently, Oh was a senior researcher and bakery section leader with SPC Group, Korea’s leading bakery and confectionary products company. His work focused on bread products including ingredients and improvers. Oh developed a commercially successful sugar-free white pan bread and served on a team that implemented Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points (HACCP) food safety management systems. He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in food and biotechnology from Korea University and Seoul National University respectively, and he successfully completed bakery and sanitation courses at AIB International, Manhattan, KS.

“Tarik Gahi is a professional miller who is well prepared to expand our technical assistance to flour mills, bakeries and biscuit manufacturers in this region,” said Ian Flagg, USW regional director for the Middle East and North Africa. “His work will focus on reinforcing the superior end-use characteristics of U.S. wheat through service and in-house milling and baking activities.”

Gahi is a 2002 graduate of IFIM, the Moroccan Milling School, who worked as a shift miller at Al Ghurair Food Group in Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 2002 to 2008. He then became a milling operations manager for Seaboard West Africa Limited in Freetown, Sierra Leone, before returning to his native Morocco as head miller/operations manager at Moulins Fassia. Gahi will apply a wide range of experience managing bread and durum wheat milling lines and related baking operations in his new position with USW.

USW activities are made possible through producer checkoff dollars managed by 19 state wheat commissions and cost-share funding provided by FAS.

Shin Hak (David) Oh

Tarik Gahi

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Nondiscrimination and Alternate Means of Communications
U.S. Wheat Associates prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, marital or family status, age, disability, political beliefs or sexual orientation. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact U.S. Wheat Associates at 202-463-0999 (TDD/TTY – 800-877-8339, or from outside the U.S.- 605-331-4923). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to Vice President of Finance, U.S. Wheat Associates, 3103 10th Street, North, Arlington, VA 22201, or call 202-463-0999. U.S. Wheat Associates is an equal opportunity provider and employer.