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Variable growing conditions greatly influenced the 2021 hard red winter (HRW) wheat crop. In areas with favorable growing conditions, high yields resulted in lower protein but excellent kernel characteristics. However, regional swings in temperature and drought led to high protein, lower yields and smaller kernels.

As a result, the overall crop has generally good kernel characteristics with flour, dough and bake attributes equal to or better than last year and many of the 5-year averages. The loaf volumes achieved indicate there is sufficient protein quality to make pan bread that easily exceeds the U.S. quality target for loaf volume, with dough mix times and stabilities that are slightly greater than the 5-year average.

This crop meets or exceeds typical HRW contract specifications and should provide high value to customers.

Weather and Harvest

Planted area for the 2021 hard red winter crop recovered from last year’s historic lows with an estimated 9.6 million hectares (23.6 million acres) seeded in fall 2020, a 10% increase over last year.

Growing conditions varied among the HRW production regions. Eastern areas of the Southern and Central Great Plains experienced favorable growing conditions resulting in high yields, very good kernel characteristics, but lower protein. While western areas of the Southern and Central Plains experienced drought and record freeze events resulting in lower yields and smaller kernels, but higher protein. The Northern Great Plains and PNW suffered historic drought conditions that hurt yield and kernel characteristics.

Production of the 2021 HRW crop is estimated to be 20.4 million metric tons (MMT), up from 17.93 MMT in 2020 and above the 5-year average of 20.8 MMT.

With very few exceptions, disease and insect pressure were not major issues for the 2021 HRW crop.

2021 map of hard red winter wheat production and sampling

2021 U.S. Hard Red Winter harvest in Oklahoma

The Daniel Crossley Farm near Okarche, Okla., was a few days into the HRW wheat harvest on June 15, 2021. Custom harvester SJS Farms, Lorreto, Minn., provided the equipment and manpower to bring in the crop. Photo by Todd Johnson, Communications Specialist, Oklahoma State University.

2021 Crop Highlights

  • The Composite average grade for the 2021 hard red winter harvest survey is U.S. No. 1 HRW. Despite challenging growing conditions in some regions, overall, 84% of Composite, 85% of Gulf-tributary and 83% of PNW-tributary samples graded U.S. No. 2 or better.
  • Test weight Composite average is 79.5 kg/hl (60.4 lb/bu), indicative of sound wheat.
  • Protein content distribution varies by growing region; Composite average is 11.9% (12% mb), equal to last year but below the 5-year average.
  • Composite averages for dockage (0.5%), total defects (1.7%), and foreign materials (0.3%) are above 2020 and 5-year averages.
  • Shrunken and broken kernels (0.8 %), values reflect the environmental challenges for this year’s crop.
  • Wheat falling number Composite average is 372 sec, indicative of sound wheat.
  • The Buhler lab mill extraction Composite average is 74.9%, above last year but below the 5-year average.
  • Flour ash Composite average of 0.50% (14% mb) is comparable to last year and 5-year averages.
  • Farinograph peak and stability times of 5.1 and 9.3 min, respectively, are shorter than last year but higher than the 5-year average.
  • Dough properties suggest that this crop has similar resistance to extension (tenacity) to both last year and the 5-year average, but slightly weaker dough strength (Alveograph W value) compared to last year and the 5-year average. Dough extensibility was significantly lower than last year but similar to the 5-year average.
  • Average bake absorption is 62.1%, below last year but comparable to the 5-year average.
  • Average loaf volume of 877 cc is well above last year and 5-year averages, indicative of acceptable baking quality.

Read more about the 2021 U.S. hard red winter wheat crop here. A full-length regional report will be available at that link as it becomes available.

2021 Crop Quality Data on Other U.S. Wheat Classes

Soft White
Soft Red Winter
Northern Durum
Desert Durum® And California Hard Red Winter
Data on other classes will be available soon

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Desert Durum® is a registered certification mark of the Arizona Grain Research and Promotion Council and the California Wheat Commission, which authorize its use only to designate durum grown under irrigation in the desert valleys and lowlands of Arizona and California.

Desert Durum® can be produced and delivered “identity preserved” to domestic and export markets, which allows customers to purchase grain with quality traits specific to their processing needs. Annual requirements can be pre-contracted with grain merchandisers ahead of the fall-winter planting season for harvest in late May through early July. Varietal identity is maintained by experienced growers planting certified seed and merchandisers who store and ship according to customers’ preferred delivery schedules.

Desert Durum® exhibits consistently large kernels and low moisture, traits that contribute to efficient transportation costs and high extraction rates. The 2021 crop will deliver the valuable milling, semolina and pasta quality traits that customers have learned to expect and appreciate.

Production

Desert Durum® Production acreage in 2021 was lower than 2020. According to USDA, yields were 2.61 tons/acre, and quality was uniformly good. Powell was the most widely grown variety in California and Arizona. Alberto was the second most grown durum variety.

2021 Crop Quality Highlights

  • The overall grade sample average for the 2021 Desert Durum® harvest survey is U.S. No. 1 Hard Amber Durum (HAD).
  • Test weight is indicative of sound wheat and a uniform crop with an average of 83.2 kg/hl (63.9 lb/bu).
  • Average Damaged kernels are 0% and Total defects are 0.6%.
  • The average Vitreous kernel (HVAC) content is 98.7%, a high average typical of Desert Durum®.
  • Wheat protein content average is 13.9% (12% mb), consistent with the 5-year average.
  • Kernel moisture content is low at 7.5%, a characteristic of Desert Durum®.
  • The semolina b* value is 32.5, similar to last year’s 32.7
  • Wet gluten average is 36.1% and Gluten index average is 69.
  • Mixograph score is 7.0 and alveograph W value is 191 (10-4 J).
  • Spaghetti color b* value is 44 and color SCORE is 10.1, higher than last year and the 5-year average.
  • Spaghetti cooked firmness average is 7.2, similar to last year and above the 5-year average

For more information on 2021 Desert Durum® crop quality, review the detailed report on the U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) website.

2021 California Hard Red Winter Wheat

California’s wheat growing regions are defined by climate, value of alternative crops and distinct differences in variety selection. Most California hard wheat is planted from October to January and harvested in June and July. With the strong demand for new crop wheat in the domestic marketplace, importers are encouraged to express their interest in purchasing California wheat in early spring.

California hard wheat varieties are known for their low moisture and large and uniform kernel size. Because wheat is predominantly grown under irrigation, growers achieve high yields and consistent quality. Overall, the majority of the 2021 crop has medium protein. Consistent with other years, the 2021 crop has low moisture, high flour extraction and strong baking performance — all of which make California wheat suitable for blending.

Weather and Production

California had below average rainfall in 2020/21, and in wheat growing regions rainfall was just over 50% of the 10-year average. Drought in the Sacramento Valley and the northern San Joaquin Valley was even more pronounced; this negatively affected stand establishment and early growth and was compounded by predation of stands by migratory geese. Disease incidence was relatively low; however, stripe rust was reported in the Delta region and the northern San Joaquin Valley. Weather during grain filling was dry and average-to-cooler-than-average in much of the state. Overall, yields were average or below average.

2021 Crop Quality Highlights

  • The overall grade sample average collected for the 2021 California HRW harvest survey is U.S. No. 1 HRW.
  • Test weight averages are indicative of sound wheat and a uniform crop with a medium protein average of 83.2 kg/hl (63.3 lb/bu) and high protein average of 81.7 kg/hl (62.1 lb/bu).
  • Kernel moisture content is low with medium protein at 9.6% and high protein at 9.7%.
  • The average wheat falling number for medium and high protein was 344 seconds and 369 seconds, respectively.
  • Laboratory mill flour extraction for medium protein was 68.2% and high protein was 66.6%.
  • This crop demonstrates excellent baking performance with an average loaf volume or medium protein at 900 cc and high protein at 945 cc.

For more information on 2021 California hard red winter and hard white crop quality, review the detailed report on the USW website.

2021 Crop Quality Data on Other U.S. Wheat Classes

Soft White
Hard Red Winter
Soft Red Winter
Northern Durum
Data on other classes will be available soon

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Originally published by Kansas Wheat. Excerpts reprinted with permission.

About 45 people from 13 U.S. states traveled on six routes across Kansas May 18 to 20, stopping at wheat fields along the routes to assess crop conditions and yield potential, as part of the 2021 Hard Winter Wheat Tour sponsored by the Wheat Quality Council.

What they found is perhaps a more productive crop than many had anticipated. The tour estimated an average yield potential of 58.1 bushels per acre, equal to 76.49 kilograms per hectoliter or 3.91 metric tons per hectare.

While an estimated 7.3 million acres of wheat were planted in the fall, the Kansas wheat crop varies in condition based on planting date and amount of moisture received. What Mother Nature has planned for the rest of the wheat crop year remains to be seen (harvest is likely 4 to 7 weeks away), but the tour captures a moment in time for the yield potential for fields across the state.

Calculating Yield in Muddy Boots

Every tour participant makes yield calculations at each stop based on three different area samplings per field. These individual estimates are averaged with the rest of their route mates and eventually added to a formula that produces a final yield estimate for the areas along the routes. The WQC held the hard winter wheat tour about 3 weeks later in May this year and more than half the fields were headed out. That allowed use of a different yield potential calculation than if the fields had not yet headed.

Recent rains across the central and southern Plains that gave tour scouts muddy boots helped improve crop conditions, especially for early seeded crops, and in northern and central Kansas that had not been stressed by dry conditions.

Day 1

On May 18, tour scouts made ­­­171 stops at wheat fields across north central, central and northwest Kansas, and into southern counties in Nebraska. The calculated yield average that day was 59.2 bushels per acre, which was 12.3 bushels higher than the yield of 46.9 bushels per acre from the same routes in 2019.

Calculating yield potential at the 2021 hard winter wheat tour

A scout in the 2021 Hard Winter Wheat Tour takes a measurement that will be used to help calculate the yield potential of this Kansas wheat field.

Day 2

The hard winter wheat tour continued May 19 with six routes covering western, southwest and south-central Kansas as well as some northern Oklahoma counties. The scouts made 164 stops in wet fields from rain received over the past several days. The wheat in southwest Kansas still looks rough, but crop conditions improved as the tour moved east.

The calculated yield from all cars this day was 56.7 bushels per acre. Tour participants remarked that those yields seemed high because the formula used to calculate yield potential does not take disease, weed nor pest pressure into consideration. Scouts saw some instances of wheat streak mosaic virus, stripe rust and Russian wheat aphid. Many of the fields with rust had been sprayed with a fungicide.

Day 3

The official hard winter wheat tour projection for total production in Kansas is 365 million bushels or 9.94 million metric tons (MMT). This number is the average of estimated predictions from tour participants who gathered information from 350 fields across the state. Based on May 1 conditions, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) predicted the Kansas crop to be 331 million bushels, with a yield of 48 bushels per acre, or 9.1 MMT. The NASS estimate is 18% more than its 2020 estimate at the same time.

The NASS estimate for the Nebraska wheat crop is 36.7 million bushels, or just under 1.0 MMT, up 8% from last year. The Colorado crop is estimated at 64.5 million bushels (1.76 MMT). Oklahoma’s production is estimated at 110.74 million bushels (3.1 MMT).

Tour participant discussions from each day of the 2021 hard winter wheat tour are posted at https://www.youtube.com/c/KansasWheat.

Read more about the 2020 virtual tour and the 2019 tour from U.S. Wheat Associates (USW).

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The new U.S. winter wheat crop is rapidly developing and U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) will publish its first “Harvest Report” for marketing year 2021/22 on Friday, May 14.

USW Harvest Reports are published every Friday afternoon, Eastern Daylight Time, throughout the season with updates and comments on harvest progress, crop conditions and current crop quality for hard red winter (HRW), soft red winter (SRW), hard red spring (HRS), soft white (SW) and durum wheat.

Anyone may subscribe to an email version of the “Harvest Report” at this link. USW includes links in the email to additional wheat condition and grading information, including the U.S. Drought Monitor, USDA/NASS Crop Progress and National Wheat Statistics, the official FGIS wheat grade standards and USDA’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report. Harvest Reports are also posted online on the USW website here.

The weekly Harvest Report is a key component of USW’s international technical and marketing programs. It is a resource that helps customers understand how the crop situation may affect basis values and export prices.

USW’s overseas offices share the report with their market contacts and use it as a key resource for answering inquiries and meeting with customers. Several USW offices publish the reports in the local language. Additional links to Harvest Report are available on USW’s Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn pages.

USW wants to thank and acknowledge the organizations that make “Harvest Reports” possible, including:

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Each of the six U.S. wheat classes brings unique advantages to the increasingly competitive global wheat market.

First, and perhaps the most important, is consistency in quality and supply. Although each new crop year brings different challenges and opportunities, high-quality U.S. wheat is always available to the global market.

Second, each class of wheat provides the ingredients needed to produce so much of the world’s food. U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) Vice President of Global Technical Services Mark Fowler makes the point this way: “Our six U.S. wheat classes give our customers the opportunity to optimize taste, texture and appearance of thousands of food products made with flour or semolina.”

Every region, country and culture have wheat-based food products that are uniquely their own. The United States has the right wheat class and quality to make every one of those products more appealing and valuable.

In the video below, Mark Fowler talks about each of the six wheat classes grown in the United States, their definition, uses and their functional characteristics.

Learn more about the six classes of U.S. wheat here or leave a question in the U.S. Wheat Associates’ “Ask The Expert” section.

Interested in more USW video content? Visit our video library at https://vimeo.com/uswheatassociates.


Read more about other classes of U.S. wheat in this series.

Hard Red Winter
Hard Red Spring
Hard White
Soft White
Soft Red Winter
Durum

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U.S. wheat farm families grow six distinct classes of wheat across the diverse landscape of the United States. Those farmers take great care in producing the highest quality wheat in the most sustainable ways possible to honor their family legacies and to ensure greater value for their customers at home and abroad. Behind the world’s most reliable supply of wheat are the world’s most dependable people.


Hucke Farms: Angie and Will Hucke are third generation farmers and ranchers from Geraldine, about 40 miles (65 km) east of Great Falls in Montana’s “Golden Triangle,” where they grow winter wheat, spring wheat, hay barley and occasionally rotate in yellow peas. Previously, Angie had a corporate job and opted to leave that lifestyle to return to the family farm. Part of returning to the family farm meant being involved in their community and raising their son, Arrow (11) and daughter, Jetta (9) in an environment where they learn about “hard work, taking pride in a job well down and learning that work can be fun.” This year, Arrow drove the grain cart – his first time helping with harvest, and it was clear how excited and proud he was. Both are very involved in 4-H, rodeo and helping with chores on the farm.

Location: Geraldine, Mont.
Classes of Wheat Grown:  Hard Red Winter (HRW) and Hard Red Spring (HRS)
Leadership: Angie Hucke: President, Miss Rodeo Montana, Inc; Vice President, Geraldine Action Committee; emergency medical technician (EMT); and 4-H leader. Will Hucke: Captain, Geraldine Volunteer Fire Department; Board Member, Chouteau County Livestock Protective Association; high school girls basketball coach; and 4-H leader. Arrow Hucke: Vice President, Willing Workers 4-H Club; and Treasurer, Geraldine Middle School. Jetta Hucke: Reporter, Willing Workers 4H Club.


View other videos and stories in this series:

Stories from the Wheat Farm – The Next Generation in Kansas
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Loving the Work in Ohio
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Committed to Stewardship in Washington
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Living with Purpose in North Dakota
Stories from the Wheat Farm – A Passion for the Land in Oklahoma
Stories from the Wheat Farm – Committed to Wheat Quality in Oregon

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Even in the face of a global pandemic, dependable U.S. wheat farmers persisted in their essential effort to produce the highest quality wheat in the world, while the reliable U.S. export supply system continued operating to move that wheat to the world.

As a key part of its commitment to transparency and trade service, U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) has produced its annual Crop Quality Report that includes grade, flour and baking data for all six U.S. wheat classes. The report compiles comprehensive data from analysis of hundreds of samples conducted during and after harvest by our partner organizations and laboratories. The report provides essential, objective information to help buyers get the wheat they need at the best value possible.

The 2020 USW Crop Quality Report is now available for download in EnglishSpanishFrench and Italian. Arabic, Chinese and, for the first time, Portuguese, translations will be available soon. USW also shares more detailed, regional reports for all six U.S. wheat classes on its website, as well as additional information on its sample and collection methods, solvent retention capacity (SRC) recommendations, standard deviation tables and more. Download these reports and resources from the www.uswheat.org here.

The pandemic has changed other traditional parts of the USW Crop Quality outreach effort. Unfortunately, face-to-face Crop Quality Seminars are not possible in 2020. Instead, USW is preparing a unique way for our customers to experience and gain more knowledge about the 2020 U.S. wheat crops. For more information, please contact your local USW office.

Continue to look for updates from the 2020 USW Crop Quality Seminars on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

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For 40 years, U.S. wheat farmers have supported U.S. Wheat Associates’ (USW) efforts to work directly with buyers and promote their six classes of wheat. Their contributions to state wheat commissions, who in turn contribute a portion of those funds to USW, qualifies USW to apply for export market development funds managed by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. Currently, 17 state wheat commissions are USW members and this series highlights those partnerships and the work being done state-by-state to provide unmatched service. Behind the world’s most reliable supply of wheat are the world’s most dependable people – and that includes our state wheat commissions.


Member: Wyoming Wheat Marketing Commission
Member of USW since 1980

Location: Cheyenne, Wyo.
Classes of wheat grown: Hard Red Winter (HRW) and Hard Red Spring (HRS)

The Wyoming Wheat Marketing Commission (WYWMC) was established in 1975 with the goal to develop and maintain wheat markets around the globe. The WYWMC is also active in providing support and funding for wheat research, education and market development. The five-person board operates on a $1.75 cent-per-bushel checkoff which funds the activities promoted by the WYWMC, including its work with U.S. Wheat Associates. 

WYWMC Director Casey Madsen (right), Nebraska wheat farmer Kent Lorens (center) and Montana wheat farmer Al Klempel (left) admired milling equipment at Kenz Maroc in Casablanca, Morocco, as participants in a USW Board Team in 2019.

Why is export market development important to Wyoming wheat farmers and why do they continue to support USW and its activities?

Based on available information, about 60 percent of the wheat produced in Wyoming is exported. Being near rail crossroads, high-quality Wyoming HRW can move either south to Gulf ports and Mexico, or west to the Pacific Northwest ports. As global wheat production has changed, the opportunity to work with USW to increase sales in Asia and the west coast of South America is of vital importance to the continued success of wheat farmers in Wyoming and across the United States. 

WYWMC Director Casey Madsen (far right) and the 2019 USW Board Team participants visited family owned Harinas Polo flour mills in Barcelona, Spain. The mill produces more than 300 different flour and seed products.

How have Wyoming wheat farmers recently connected with overseas customers?

For several years, WYWMC members have taken part in overseas trade mission trips and have also participated in overseas buyers’ conferences. The opportunity to make connections with overseas customers by meeting with them face-to-face is invaluable. While current events have limited these opportunities, we joined USW and other state commissions in a virtual meeting with Colombian wheat customers earlier this summer. 

WYWMC Director Ken Tremain (right) visited  Groupe HM-owned Caribbean Milling in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, as a participant in a USW Board Team in 2017. Caribbean Milling is the newest mill in Haiti, and started importing U.S. hard red winter (HRW) in 2016.

What is happening lately in Wyoming that overseas customers should know about?

While Wyoming has a relatively small wheat production area compared to most other USW member states, our unique production issues compel us to conduct research for our high-altitude and short growing season. Wyoming is often the first to plant HRW, and often among the last to harvest. We look at experimental varieties from three neighboring states to produce wheat with higher end-use qualities for customers, while minimizing input costs so that Wyoming wheat farmers can remain profitable. We recently licensed a new variety from Colorado which will allow farmers in Wyoming to better address a new type of stripe rust, which periodically affects Wyoming wheat production.

The commission is also active in trade and domestic policy. We have actively engaged with U.S. government officials, including the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), to promote expansion of trade access and avoid market disruption due to tariff implementation, while remaining in close contact with our Congressional delegation to influence domestic production issues.

Learn more about the Wyoming Wheat Marketing Commission on its web page here.

WYWMC Director Ken Tremain and fellow USW Board Team participants visited a food market in Santiago, Chile, to see local wheat foods in 2017.

 

 

 

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Variable growing conditions greatly influenced the 2020 U.S. hard red winter (HRW) wheat crop. In areas with favorable growing conditions, record yields resulted in lower protein but excellent test weights and kernel characteristics, while regional swings in temperature and moisture led to lower yields with higher protein. The result is a crop that has generally outstanding kernel characteristics with flour, dough and bake quality attributes equal to or better than last year and many of the 5-year averages. Overall, the 2020 HRW crop can be characterized as clean and sound with good milling and processing characteristics, providing customers with an exceptionally good range of quality and value.

U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) has posted the full 2020 Hard Red Winter Regional Report on its website here, as well as the 2020 California Hard Red Winter Regional Report here.

USDA estimates the 2020 HRW planted area was again near historic 100-year lows, continuing the trend of recent years. Total HRW production is estimated at 17.9 MMT (695 mil bu), a 4.8 MMT (174 mil bu) decrease from 2019. Growing conditions varied among the HRW production regions.

  • The western Central and Southern Great Plains experienced insufficient moisture, freeze events and high temperatures during key stages of crop development, resulting in lower yields and kernel size, but higher protein.
  • The eastern Central and Southern Great Plains experienced favorable growing conditions resulting in record yields and very good kernel characteristics, but lower protein.
  • The Northern Great Plains and Pacific Northwest also experienced variable growing conditions. Washington, Montana and South Dakota harvested crops are equal to or better than average with very good kernel characteristics and protein. However, Oregon experienced a significant reduction in yield due to unseasonably dry weather.

With very few exceptions disease and insects were not a major issue for the 2020 HRW crop.

Here are highlights of data from the 2020 HRW wheat crop.

 

Wheat and Grade Data:

  • Grade – the overall average is U.S. No. 2 or better.
  • Test Weight average of 61.4 lb/bu (80.8 kg/hl) is above 2019 and the 5-year averages.
  • Dockage, total defects and foreign material averages are all equal to or similar to 2019 and the 5-year averages.
  • Wheat Protein (11.9%, 12% mb) and shrunken and broken (1.1%) are above 2019 and the 5-year averages.
  • 1000 Kernel Weight averages at 31.2 g, which is less than 2019 but higher than the 5-year average.
  • Wheat Falling Number – Average of 369 sec, indicative of sound wheat.

 

Flour and Baking Data:

  • Laboratory Mill Flour Extraction average is 73.5%, lower than the 2019 and 5-year averages of 74.5% and 75.4%, respectively.
  • Flour Ash levels of 0.49% (14% mb) is comparable to last year but lower than the 5-year average.
  • Alveograph W value of 261(10-4 J) is significantly higher than last year and the 5-year averages.
  • Farinograph peak and stability times, 5.3 and 10.3 min, respectively, are higher than the 2019 and the 5-year averages. Average bake absorption is 63.1%, also above the value for 2019 and the 5-year average.
  • Loaf volume averaged 859 cc, comparable to last year’s and the 5-year averages.

Buyers are encouraged to review their quality specifications to ensure that their purchases meet their expectations.


View other summaries of the 2020 U.S. wheat crop:
Hard Red Spring
Hard White
Soft White
Soft Red Winter
Durum

View the full 2020 U.S. Crop Quality Report and other related resources here.

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For 40 years, U.S. wheat farmers have supported U.S. Wheat Associates’ (USW) efforts to work directly with buyers and promote their six classes of wheat. Their contributions to state wheat commissions, who in turn contribute a portion of those funds to USW, qualifies USW to apply for export market development funds managed by USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service. Currently, 17 state wheat commissions are USW members and this series highlights those partnerships and the work being done state-by-state to provide unmatched service. Behind the world’s most reliable supply of wheat are the world’s most dependable people – and that includes our state wheat commissions.


Member: Texas Wheat Producers Board
Member of USW since 1980

Location: Amarillo, Tex.
Classes of wheat grown: Hard Red Winter (HRW) and Soft Red Winter (SRW)

The Texas Wheat Producers Board (TWPB) was established in 1971 to provide support and funding for wheat research, education and market development. The fifteen-person board, which operates on a two-cent-per-bushel checkoff fund, is committed to ensuring the competitiveness of Texas wheat in domestic and international markets. These goals are accomplished through unique partnerships with U.S. Wheat Associates, and Plains Grains, Inc. Current research shows that wheat growers receive a $23 dollar return for every dollar invested in overseas marketing efforts.

Jack Norman served on the Texas Wheat Producers Board for 30 years and attended many USW events in that time. In 1998, he traveled with USW to Morocco, Kenya and Egypt. Jack retired from the Texas Wheat board last year.

Why is export market development important to Texas wheat farmers and why do they continue to support USW and its activities?

More than 50 percent of the wheat produced in Texas is exported every year. The TWPB has made it a priority to develop and maintain strong relationships with overseas customers to ensure the profitability of high-quality Texas HRW and SRW wheat. We are uniquely located geographically. The ports along the Texas coast, most prominently the Port of Houston, move over one-third of the wheat exported by the United States. Our location is highly accessible for Mexico, the largest importer of Texas wheat and consistently one of the top importers of U.S. wheat overall. It is imperative to our mission that we work with USW to promote wheat, expand market access and maintain good relationships with overseas customers. We believe the work done by USW will not only help us achieve our goals but also create a better future for all wheat producers.

How have Texas wheat farmers recently connected with overseas customers?

TWPB members have a long history of taking part in overseas trade mission trips, as well as hosting international trade delegations in Texas, and we value the experiences built through meeting customers face-to-face. Although the global pandemic put on hold on these meetings, we have used virtual platforms to connect with vital markets. In June, we joined USW for a virtual meeting with African wheat buyers, providing background on how wheat is produced in Texas and sharing updates on the 2020 wheat harvest. In July, our staff participated in another virtual meeting with Chilean flour milling executives and worked with Colorado Wheat staff to give an overview of 2020 HRW wheat quality. Both these virtual meetings gave us the opportunity to discuss the importance of Texas in the wheat production cycle, from the development of new varieties to the export of grain from our ports, which will help carry out our mission to increase demand of Texas-grown wheat.

A USW Brazilian Trade Delegation in College Station, Texas, in 2019, after a tour of the Texas A&M wheat breeding and research labs.

What is happening lately in Texas that overseas customers should know about?

The TWPB has always put a major focus on research. Based on the feedback from overseas markets, we have invested in projects aimed at enhancing end-use quality in order to produce a product with more functionality for our customers. Last year, our state researchers released two new winter wheat varieties that performed well with fewer inputs, decreasing the financial burden on farmers, while demonstrating exceptional milling and baking characteristics. Because of this research, we can supply a high-quality wheat without impacting the cost.

The board has also been active in trade policy. We have actively engaged with U.S. government officials, including the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), to promote expansion of trade access and avoid market disruption due to tariff implementation. It is our priority to provide overseas customers with a high-quality wheat that is also affordable, and we will continue to work with USW to promote favorable trade agreements.

Learn more about the Texas Wheat Producers Board on its website here and on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

 

TWPB sponsored a Texas A&M AgriLife Research wheat breeder, Dr. Jackie Rudd, on his trip to the 2019 USW Breeders Team to Latin America. He attended in order to connect with buyers on their quality needs and he has implemented their feedback directly into the Texas breeding program.

In 2015, a delegation of Texas Wheat representatives, including current USW board member Ken Davis (middle), traveled to Cuba for a trade alliance meeting.

A 2018 USW Sub-Saharan African Trade Delegation in Houston at an export terminal elevator.